Strike Deadline July 4

CUPE Local 1989 is back at the bargaining table on June 27, 28, and 29. We are holding a strike or ratification vote on June 30, and will be in a potential legal strike position on July 4.

staff demographics

What are the issues?

• In 2014 and 2015, the City of Mississauga gave us a 0.5% cost-of-living increase. In 2015, Library Director Rose Vespa received a 7.3% salary increase, raising her pay to $176,000.

• Our “Pages” – the people who put the books on the shelves – earn only pennies above minimum wage. This is less than $15,000 per year. Try living in Peel on that!

• Mayor Crombie says she’s serious about reducing poverty in Mississauga, but the City is paying poverty wages to 112 dedicated library workers.

MLS to BPL

• 56% of our members work part-time. They have NO benefits, NO paid sick days, NO paid vacation. Most are scheduled for only 12-16 hours per week. Many have seen their schedules cut to only 8 hours, the result of increased automation like self-checkout.

Can the City of Mississauga afford to spend more on libraries?

Infographic raises• Library managers salaries total approximately $2.3 million.

• City Manager Janice Baker earns $280,000 per year.

• 550 City employees earn more than $100,000 per year.

• Mississauga has spent millions rolling out a new logo. We think the City should invest more in people than appearances.

Love your library? Want to help?

• Contact the Library Board, City Councillors, and Mayor Crombie. Tell them you love your library and you rely on library staff.

• Ask them to treat library workers with fairness and respect!

Bonnie Crombie
Mayor
905-896-5555
mayor@mississauga.ca

John Kovac
Councillor, Library Board member
905-896-5400
john.kovac@mississauga.ca

Matt Mahoney
Councillor, Library Board member
905-896-5800
matt.mahoney@mississauga.ca

 

The Rebirth of a Local

unions

Mississauga Library Workers Union is pleased to announce that it is once again CUPE Local 1989.

The Mississauga Library Workers have a 40-year history with CUPE. On August 23rd, 1975, the Mississauga Library Staff Association (formed in April 1964) applied for a CUPE charter . The charter was approved by the CUPE National Executive Board on May 10, 1976. Mississauga Library staff had succeeded in becoming unionized!

We enrolled all full-time non-management library workers. Within a few years, the Library had far more part-timers, weakening CUPE Local 1989’s negotiating position. On the fourth attempt, part-timers and pages were signed up and a separate contract was negotiated for them.  To further strengthen our position at the bargaining table, in 1995, the part-time and full-time collective agreements were merged into one.

CUPE Local 1989 led the formation of Peel District CUPE Council, was among the first CUPE locals to join what is now Peel Regional Labour Council, and led the merger of CUPE Local 966. Being part of a bigger local had some advantages and some disadvantages.  As one of sixteen units of CUPE Local 966, there was much comradery and support. Collectively, we could afford a full-time union executive.

Mississauga Library Workers were an active part of CUPE Local 966 with members on various committees participating in rallies, parades, pickets, and social events. In the process however, we felt we had lost our unique identity as Mississauga Library Workers. We decided, as a unit, that we wanted to go back to being able to govern ourselves as a smaller local with a single collective agreement.

Now, 40 years after we first applied for a CUPE charter, we applied for a transfer of jurisdiction to once again become CUPE Local 1989, Mississauga Library Workers Union. The CUPE National Executive Board approved our charter and reassigned us our old number. One of our talented members designed a beautiful new logo.

Cupe Logo 400x400

Since most of our current members were not part of the union 40 years ago, there must be much more to CUPE 1989’s history than we can know. All Mississauga Library workers, past and present, are invited to tell their CUPE 1989 stories which we hope to share on this website. See what you can remember and tell us about it. Send in your photos, too. We would love to hear from you.

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